Keeping Your Guinea Pig Healthy

Guinea Pig Care Secrets covers all of this, and a lot more. And when you read it, you’ll be BLOWN AWAY with how simple it really is to care for guinea pigs.

Here’s just a taste of what you’ll discover…

  • A complete guide to the guinea pig cage and how to easily maintain a healthy environment.
  • The 5 things you must do before placing your guinea pig in his new home.
  • What to feed your guinea pig – and what not to give him! There is a ton of inaccurate info out there. I’ll tell you the truth so you never have to wonder again!
  • How to care for a single guinea pig and more than one!
  • The importance of bedding and why this is a crucial component of your cage. I’ll tell you what type of bedding to buy and how much to use.
  • How to choose a healthy guinea pig from the store — there are little known things to look for that the pet store owner’s don’t want you to know!
  • The surefire signs of guinea pig illness that will tell you if your guinea pig needs medical attention.
  • An entire chapter devoted to guinea pig illnesses and cures. Your guinea pig has the potential to completely recover from an illness, but it’s not how you think. I’ll show you the truth about curing your guinea pig.
  • Why a specific type of bedding – frequently recommended – is actually extremely dangerous for your guinea pig. It’s known to cause respiratory problems.
  • A complete guide to all the accessories your guinea pig needs to be happy in his new home.
  • A complete guinea pig first aid kit. This is an important one! The supplies in this kit just may save your guinea pig’s life!
  • Where you should never place your guinea pig cage in your house. Put it here and it just might kill him!
  • How to tell if your guinea pig is running a fever. The proper body temperature for a guinea pig (you may be surprised to learn what it is!).
  • What’s the proper heart rate for your guinea pig? Guinea Pig Care Secrets will tell you.
  • Where in the room to place your guinea pig cage.
  • A crash course on guinea pig behavior. Knowing what’s normal and healthy behavior – and what’s not! – can help you provide the best possible care for your guinea pig.
  • All about feeding your guinea pig, including tips on varying his diet to make sure his intestinal tract stays healthy.
  • What to do if your guinea pig won’t eat.
  • The importance of quarantine cage and how to set one up.
  • Why your guinea pig loves to be on a schedule – and why it’s great for his health.
  • An entire chapter devoted to breeding your guinea pigs — step-by-step instructions from start to finish.
  • How to prepare food for your guinea pig. This one is easy, and it’s a ton of fun to watch him eat it!
  • What your guinea pig can’t eat! Knowing this will save your guinea pig from potential health problems.
  • How to arrange your plants in your tank for optimum visual effect.
  • How to properly introduce your guinea pig to his new cage mates. This is very important as you don’t want to cause your guinea pigs any undue stress as it could lead to illnesses later on.

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The Ultimate Guide to a Happy Healthy Guinea Pig: A Review of the EBook by Rachel Garlick

Introduction and Overview:

Overall the eBook “The Ultimate Guide to a Happy Healthy Guinea Pig” is a very good reference guide about the care of your guinea pigs. It gives you a lot of helpful tips on housing, diet, behavior, grooming, common health issues and breeding of your pet guinea pigs. It also includes information on guinea pig history and some facts about different breeds of guinea pigs.

Product Overview:

The Ultimate Guide to a Happy Healthy Guinea Pig by Rachel Garlick is a 65 page PDF downloadable eBook. It is currently priced at $14.77 while it is being market tested, but the author warns that after the test market concludes it will rise in price to $20.00.

There are three bonuses that were included in the $14.77 price. The bonuses are Guinea Pig Names (PDF format), Guinea Pig Quick Start (PDF format), and Guinea Pig Shopping (HTML Document). The Guinea Pig Names bonus helps you to choose a name for your furry friend from many popular and creative categories like cartoon characters and food. Guinea Pig Quick Start is a guide for the items and supplies you will need when you first bring your piggy home. The last bonus “Guinea Pig Shopping” contains a number of pictures of the items you will need to shop for before you bring your companion home.

What I Like About The Ultimate Guide to a Happy Healthy Guinea Pig

The most important information that is included in this eBook in my opinion is the list of foods that a guinea pig can eat and the foods that can harm or possibly kill your pig. It was especially helpful to read about the dangerous foods for your pigs. For example, did you know potato peels are bad for your pig to eat?

Also, it was interesting to learn that guinea pigs and humans share a common trait: we both can’t manufacture vitamin C. That is why it is important that your pig has vitamin C in their pellets, veggies, fruits and a supplement to be healthy and to avoid getting scurvy.

When it comes to shopping for a cage for your pig(s) the bigger the better is the rule. The eBook suggests 7.5 sq. ft (30″x36″) for one and 10.5 sq. ft (30″x50″) for two pigs. This is consistent with what is generally recommended by guinea pig rescue organizations for cage sizes. The eBook informs you that a wire grid bottom for your cage can harm your pig’s delicate feet and definitely should be avoided

The guide discusses the different behaviors and that guinea pigs are social animals. This chapter was helpful on understanding my pigs and interpreting what their behavior means.

What I Did Not Like About The Ultimate Guide to a Happy Healthy Guinea Pig

The eBook does not include any information about the Cubes and Coroplast (C&C) cages that are a popular cage system for providing a larger and healthier environment for your guinea pig. The shopping guide bonus only included pictures of pet store cages that are too small and cramped.

I also would have liked to see a warning about keeping your pigs in an aquarium, which can cause respiratory problems from the ammonia fumes. The glass enclosure does not let the air circulate and the ammonia fumes from the urine can be harmful to your pig.

Rating

I would rate this eBook 4.0 out of 5 stars. The reason I did not rate it 5 stars is because they did not provide any information on how to build or obtain a larger and healthier C&C cage for your pigs that meets their minimum cage-size requirements.

The “Ultimate Guide to a Happy Healthy Guinea Pig” was worth the $14.77 for all of the helpful information and bonuses that it included. It would be especially beneficial for the beginner that never cared for a guinea pig before. Many people do not know the proper diet for a guinea pig and their need for vitamin C. In conclusion, I would recommend it for those that care enough to seek out the knowledge necessary to provide their guinea pig(s) the best living environment possible.

We here at Blue Stone Commerce are pet owners as well as pet cage sellers. Visit Our Website http://www.BlueStoneCages.com for lots more info on guinea pigs and guinea pig cages. Be sure to Claim Your FREE BONUS GIFT available on the front page. Follow Us on Twitter: http://twitter.com/guineapig9

Guinea Pigs Health Problems

When you first decide to bring a guinea pig into your home, you should be sure that there is a vet who specializes in small pet care in your immediate area. Many people may not consider the expense of veterinary care for other small pets like hamsters or gerbils who live an average of two years, but guinea pigs are not disposal pets. Because they can live on average 4-8 years, they should be considered long-term members of your family, just like a dog or a cat.

Why should you find a vet this early? Because guinea pigs can become ill quickly and deteoriorate rapidly. If you wait to try to find a vet after your pet becomes ill and run into difficulties, it might be too late to save your guinea pig.

With dogs or cats, owners generally take them in for a check-up when its time to renew their shots. Since guinea pigs don’t need shots, it can be easy to take their good health for granted. Your guinea pig should see his or her vet at least once a year as well.

Not all vets will treat guinea pigs, so if you have a vet already who treats your other pets, you may want to ask him or her first about whether or not they will be able to care for the new addition to your family. If they don’t, ask them to recommend a vet who does.

If you don’t already have a vet, then you can check with your local yellow pages to find one. Most advertise that whether or not they accept small pets. Another option is to use an online vet finder, such as the one available at http://www.aracnet.com/cgi-usr/seagull/vetfinder.cgi. You simply enter your state, and a list of vets who work with guinea pigs will appear. This particular service is not comprehensive, but it will serve as a good starting point for your search for a vet.

Once you purchase your new family member, it might be a good idea to take him or her to your vet for a thorough check-up, especially if you will be bringing it home to other guinea pigs or pets.

As I mentioned above, a guinea pig can become sick quickly and things can go from bad to worse before you realize it. For that reason, it is important to always keep a watchful eye on your cavy because there are a few signs that should immediately alert you that your guinea pig may be sick.

Florian Ross developed comprehensive guides to help people succeed with their guinea pigs. Find out more about how to have your guinea pig live 2 times longer with his popular free ecourse at =>pets-lovers.com

Guinea Pigs Health Problems – How to Deal With Them?

When you first decide to bring a guinea pig into your home, you should be sure that there is a vet who specializes in small pet care in your immediate area. Many people may not consider the expense of veterinary care for other small pets like hamsters or gerbils who live an average of two years, but guinea pigs are not disposal pets. Because they can live on average 4-8 years, they should be considered long-term members of your family, just like a dog or a cat.

Why should you find a vet this early? Because guinea pigs can become ill quickly and deteoriorate rapidly. If you wait to try to find a vet after your pet becomes ill and run into difficulties, it might be too late to save your guinea pig.

With dogs or cats, owners generally take them in for a check-up when its time to renew their shots. Since guinea pigs don’t need shots, it can be easy to take their good health for granted. Your guinea pig should see his or her vet at least once a year as well.

Not all vets will treat guinea pigs, so if you have a vet already who treats your other pets, you may want to ask him or her first about whether or not they will be able to care for the new addition to your family. If they don’t, ask them to recommend a vet who does.

If you don’t already have a vet, then you can check with your local yellow pages to find one. Most advertise that whether or not they accept small pets. Another option is to use an online vet finder, such as the one available at http://www.aracnet.com/cgi-usr/seagull/vetfinder.cgi. You simply enter your state, and a list of vets who work with guinea pigs will appear. This particular service is not comprehensive, but it will serve as a good starting point for your search for a vet.

Once you purchase your new family member, it might be a good idea to take him or her to your vet for a thorough check-up, especially if you will be bringing it home to other guinea pigs or pets.

As I mentioned above, a guinea pig can become sick quickly and things can go from bad to worse before you realize it. For that reason, it is important to always keep a watchful eye on your cavy because there are a few signs that should immediately alert you that your guinea pig may be sick.

Florian Ross developed comprehensive guides to help people succeed with their guinea pig pet. Find out more tips about raising a


Guinea Pig and how to have your guinea pig live two times longer with his popular free ecourse .


Would you like to get in on his free Newsletter? Visit www.pets-lovers.com to get started today!

Preventative Care Is Best For Guinea Pig Health

As with any pet, your guinea pig depends on you completely for it’s health and well-being. This article may help you by serving as a basic guide of guinea pig health care and give you an idea of what symptoms of illness to watch out for. Of course if you feel your cavy is sick then don’t delay in getting him or her to the veterinarian for a checkup and treatment.

You can practice good guinea pig health by providing your cavy with preventative health care. Preventing illness is a lot easier, and a lot less expensive, that treating illnesses. Cavies are hardy little creatures and with good preventative health care they can have a long, healthy life.

Keeping Your Guinea Pig Healthy

There are some basic levels of care that you can provide your cavy to keep him healthy. Here is a list:

Provide healthy, nutritious food and a plenty of clean, fresh water
Make sure they have lots of room in their cage or hutch to run around, play, and get their exercise.
Make sure they have something like a “nest box” where they can hide away if they need to
If possible have two cavies – they love companionship and it really is best for them
Make sure their cage or hutch is clean, dry, and away from cold drafts
Make sure that their cage location is not subject to extreme heat or humidity
Keep them in a quiet environment
Give them fun toys, and specifically chew toys to keep their teeth healthy and trimmed
Most importantly, give them lots of your attention.

Knowing the Signs of Illness in Your Pet

In order to recognize a sick cavy, it is first important to know how a healthy cavy looks and acts. A healthy cavy will have bright, clear eyes and a shiny coat. A sick animal will have a dull look in it’s eyes, the coat will be dull and in poor condition, it may have patches of hair missing, and will look thin. A healthy cavy will act alert, have a good appetite, will drink water, will vocalize, play, and have normal urination and poop. A sick cavy will be lethargic, have no appetite, is not drinking water, may have abnormal posture, and is not having normal urination and poops.

Common Health Problems

Cavies can come down with a variety of bacterial and fungal infections, and parasites, which can cause problems with their eyes, ears, and digestive system. It is important to give your pet cavy a daily looking over to make sure they aren’t coming down with something, because when a cavy comes down with an illness it becomes very fragile and it’s health can deteriorate very quickly in a very short period of time.

Dehydration: this can be caused by your cavy not drinking enough water, prolonged exposure to a hot environment, or from diarrhea caused by illness
Dental Problems: Your cavies teeth continue to grow throughout their lives. Most dental problems can be avoided by giving your pet chew toys and feeding hard pellets which will keep the teeth trimmed. But sometimes your pet’s teeth do not grow in proper alignment. If not treated this can be very painful resulting in your cavy’s inability to eat and could actually result in starvation and death.
Ear Problems: Ear problems can be caused by infection, parasites, or injury. Indications of ear problems include scratching, head shaking, tilting the head to one side, and loss of balance.
Eye Problems: Eye problems are usually caused by injury, infection, or an irritating object in the eye. If your pets eyes appear dull, have a discharge, or he keeps them closed, then place him in a darkened room because the problem may be painful and make their eyes sensitive to light.
Tummy Problems: If your guinea pig has diarrhea, or is constipated, it may be because he has a gastrointestinal bacterial infection, is not eating a proper diet, is suffering from stress, or is living in a dirty cage. Diarrhea needs to be treated quickly, otherwise it can quickly lead to dehydration and possibly death.
Heatstroke: Cavies can overheat very easily if exposed to high temperatures. It will quickly become weak, unresponsive, and eventually comatose. Without immediate treatment it will die.
Respiratory Problems: If you hear your cavy wheezing, sneezing, or otherwise having difficulty breathing you need to take these symptoms seriously. These symptoms may be caused by bacterial infection and your pet could develop pneumonia, the most frequent cause of death in cavies.
Skin and Hair Problems: Sores, dry itchy skin, loss of fur, and oozing sores are all signs of skin problems. There can be a variety of causes of these symptoms including skin parasites, allergies, stress, and diseases. Your veterinarian will need to diagnose the exact cause.

Summary

Remember that good guinea pig health starts with prevention. A daily routine that includes handling your pet cavy so that you can give it an “examination” is a good idea. The earlier that you identify an illness in your pet and can seek veterinary care the better chances of cure and a quick recovery. Your pet cavy needs you – take good care of him!

Mike Andrews is a 52-year Colorado native and is a practicing real estate broker. Mike also dabbles as an internet marketer and operates several online businesses. Mike is a life-long animal lover, a guinea pig enthusiast, and the author of dozens of pet care articles.

For additional information relating to guinea pig health please visit his website at http://www.petguineapigsinfo.com. Peace.

Things To Know About Guinea Pig Health

This report has been written to aid you in recognizing a number of symptoms that pertain to Guinea Pig Health. It’s not intended to substitute the advice of your veterinarian. If you think that your pet is ill or injured please seek the help of your trusted licensed vet.

The best medicine will always be prevention. This is your key to success. Be prepared to give your Guinea Pig the proper diet, exercise and daily attention, and the result will be excellent Guinea Pig health.

I must mention that most guinea pigs are not fond of bathing (much like their feline friends cats). Only when it becomes absolutely necessary should you subject them to the stress of immersing them in water. A clean and sanitary living space free of feces, urine and unwanted food will add years to your guinea pigs health. Spot clean the litter material daily and disinfect the entire cage once every ten days. Cavy’s (another name for Guinea Pigs) are much more likely to contract disease and illness when compared to other common household pets. Some believe the size of the cage is responsible for this. If we envision the living space Rex and Fluffy are entitled to, and then look at where the little fur ball sleeps, it begins to make sense. Guinea pigs spend their lives in a much smaller space.

Frequent sneezing and sniffling. The bedding material in the cage can cause allergies. Often times new places and objects like plants, carpet and even the fibers on your sofa may be to blame. Substitute the bedding and stay clear of suspect areas. Constant nose irritation is a sign to make a Vet visit.

Coughing This can be life-threatening. Any type of Heavy Respiration, wheezing or panting sounds could be a signal of a repertory disease. Call your vet ASAP. Delaying this engagement can be grave for your guinea pigs health.

Watery eyes. Bothersome particles like dust, dirt, pollen, and powder can occasionally induce this. Visit your Vet and ask for directions on how to safely flush the eyes of your pet. Agonizing sores from cysts can arise on pet’s eyes and should be removed by a qualified Vet.

Hair loss. When a Cavy is cut or bitten the fur near the injury will fall out. This is entirely natural.Extreme hair loss is much more severe. Parasites such as mites, ringworm and fleas may be to blame and should be treated by your vet right away. Diarrhea. Too many wet foods is the likely suspect. Curb the fruit and vegetable intake , and up the amount of hay, pellets with vitamin C, and dried foods. Lactobacillus acidophiles in capsule form purchased from your Vet or pet store can remedy the problem. Add the recommended dose to water or administer directly from dropper to your pet’s mouth.

Pink or red urine. Get your pet to the Vet ASAP! Discharging blood from the urinary tract can be fatal and requires immediate attention.

Scratching and itching. Parasites and fungus can invade your pet without warning. Examine your Guinea Pig’s coat frequently. You can obtain a medicated hair shampoo that fights most parasites and fungal infestations from your Vet or local pet shop. If the trouble remains look up your Vet.

Convulsions and tilting the head. A dangerous condition that requires immediate examination by a qualified Vet. Severe and painful ear infections lead to these symptoms. Wounds caused from parasites have been linked to brain and nervous system abnormalities. Symptoms such as body curling, shaking,stiffness and erratic behavior can result from parasites.

In Conclusion. The most significant aspect of bringing up a healthy Guinea Pig and the key to sustaining the life of your little fur ball is by keeping his/her cage clean. Change the litter material regularly and sanitize the cage frequently. Doing this will prevent some of the unfortunate symptoms discussed in this report and ensure good guinea pig health!

Author G.Anthony Evers invites you to learn more about Guinea Pig Health and a complete Guinea Pig care guide at Healthy Guinea Pig.Com

Guinea Pig Health – Simple Tips To Keep Your Pet Guinea Pigs Happy

Although they make great pets that seem to be easy to take care there are thing you should be aware of that affect guinea pig health. Diet, your pet guinea pig’s habitat, exercise, and other factors all determine how healthy  your cavy will stay.  To start with, your guinea pig needs lots of vitmain C, which just like in humans, isn’t produced naturally by their body. Most people choose the option of adding vitamin c drop or tables to their pet guinea pigs water. This changes the taste of their water and can actually have two detrimental effects. First, they will drink less water due to the bad taste, and secondly, they won’t recieve the needed vitamin c.  To fix this you should feed your guinea pigs fresh, green, leafy vegetables daily along with the regular “guina pig food” pellets that you can purchase from a local pet supply store. Vegetable like kale and romaine lettuce have plenty of vitamin c and they will do much to maintain guinea pig health. They will love the variety of different green food and see it as a treat. This can be a little bonding ritual you do with guinea pig that will build trust.  Since their teeth and claws grow constantly they will require a gnawing stick and frequent nail clippings. If left unchecked long claws can really affect the health of your guinea pig by picking up dirty material from their cage and digging in to their paws. You can use a fruit tree branch as a gnawing stick or buy an untreated wooden block from a pet store.  

Although they make great pets that seem to be easy to take care there are thing you should be aware of that affect guinea pig health. Diet, your pet guinea pig’s habitat, exercise, and other factors all determine how healthy  your cavy will stay. 

 

To start with, your guinea pig needs lots of vitmain C, which just like in humans, isn’t produced naturally by their body. Most people choose the option of adding vitamin c drop or tables to their pet guinea pigs water. This changes the taste of their water and can actually have two detrimental effects. First, they will drink less water due to the bad taste, and secondly, they won’t recieve the needed vitamin c. 

 

To fix this you should feed your guinea pigs fresh, green, leafy vegetables daily along with the regular “guina pig food” pellets that you can purchase from a local pet supply store. Vegetable like kale and romaine lettuce have plenty of vitamin c and they will do much to maintain guinea pig health. They will love the variety of different green food and see it as a treat. This can be a little bonding ritual you do with guinea pig that will build trust. 

 

Since their teeth and claws grow constantly they will require a gnawing stick and frequent nail clippings. If left unchecked long claws can really affect the health of your guinea pig by picking up dirty material from their cage and digging in to their paws. You can use a fruit tree branch as a gnawing stick or buy an untreated wooden block from a pet store.  

 

For the mental and emotional health of your pet guinea pigs consider owning more than two or three. Since they are herd animals, the more guineas that live and play together the more natural of an environment they will be in. Keep in mind that males may try to compete for dominance. Unfixed cavies will most likely lead to a quick multiplying of your herd as well. Gentle handling, plenty of exercise, the proper diet, and a safe, clean habitat will keep your pet guinea pigs healthy and happy for years to come.

3 Essential Bits Of Advice For Exercising Your Cavies

As with most pets, guinea pigs need to be kept healthy and fit. By far the best way to do this is simply to let them loose to run about unrestricted in an area large enough for them to really enjoy themselves. This space can be outdoors or indoors, but in both cases it is very important to take some precautions to keep your animals safe:

1. Make Sure They Are Well Contained

Despite the fact that they are larger than other rodents, guinea pigs have quite thin bodies. When you combine this with their adventurous tendencies, you’ll find that if you don’t watch them, they will soon squeeze their way into a small space, and they’ll be very reluctant to leave!

To prevent this, you should fence them in in some way. Ideally it is best to use a special run, which is like a big cage for them to run about in, but if you don’t have one then it is quite possible make do by fencing off a space using boxes, chairs, and other household items.

2. Protect Their Soft Feet

Although we don’t always notice it, the carpets and rugs of our homes can be potentially fairly dangerous to guinea pigs. Things like loose stones, which we barely notice, can be quite painful when walked over with their soft paws, and can also be a potential choking hazard if they pick them up and eat them.

Whenever possible, it is best to exercise your guinea pigs on a soft surface such as carpet or grass. This is much easier on their soft feet, and ensures they can run about for much longer. If you can’t find a soft surface for them to use, you can make one very easily, simply by putting a cloth or some newspaper over a whatever surface they’re running on.

3. Be Aware Of Potential Hazards

Ask most pet lovers, and they are sure to remember a time when one of their pets bit through a wire. Not only is this annoying to you, it could also be potentially dangerous to your pet. Clear your guinea pigs’ running area of any cables and wires before you let them out.

Another thing to watch for is that if you have any other pets, these are kept well out of the way, in case they decide that your fluffy friend would make a tasty treat!

Alan loves pets, and thinks taht guinea pigs are among his favourites. He runs a blog, We Love Guinea Pigs!, which offers tips and advice on subjects such as caring for your guinea pig.

Guinea Pig Grooming

Guinea Pig Grooming

A guinea pig can be one of the cutest and loving pets that anyone can have. These delicate little creatures will depend on its owner(s) to provide them with all the TLC that they will need. Providing food, water, and medical care are some of the basic needs that you are required to give your guinea. Guinea pig grooming is a must as well. If you have a short haired pig, grooming needs can be kept at a minimum. If you have a long haired pig, you will need to devote more time to grooming. The remainder of this article will go over all of the basics of pig grooming.

To keep your guinea pig’s coat in good condition, you must brush it regularly. This part of guinea grooming can be very relaxing for your pet, so they do not mind it at all. You should brush your pet with a small and moderately stiff brush and also a small metal comb. If you have a long haired piggy, you should brush and comb out its hair every day. If the coat is too long, see a groomer about having it trimmed. If you have a short haired piggy, you should only have to brush it every few days. If your guinea is shedding, try to brush its hair at least every other day. Brushing time is also a good time to check your guinea for skin problems such as lice or sores.

Bathing, at sometimes, cannot be such a good time for guineas . With your guinea grooming, if you do decide to give your piggy a bath, try to find a shampoo that is designed specifically for guinea pigs. Some brands of shampoos that are good to use are Bunny Bath by Four Paws, Hylyt Hypoallergenic Shampoo, and Epi-Soothe Shampoo. If you cannot find any of these, then it would be best to use a mild shampoo that is recommended for kittens. Some pig owners even opt to use baby shampoo. If your guinea gets lice, then your veterinarian will recommend a medicated shampoo to use. When bathing your pet, use a shallow pan of lukewarm water and make sure that only the pig’s body is lathered. Also make sure that you do not get any shampoo or water in its eyes or ears. You would want to rinse the pet well and to towel dry it. Keep your guinea pig in a warm place until it is completely dry.

Guinea pig grooming also consists of regular nail clipping. Try to clip your guineas nails at least once a month to keep the nails in good shape. Also remember that, the longer the nails get, the harder it will be to trim them. It is also recommended that you examine your pets ears each week. To clean its ears, you can place a drop of mineral oil in each ear, let sit for about 5 minutes, and then clean the outer ear carefully with a soft cloth wrapped around your finger.

Guinea pig grooming is not a hard process to keep up with. After all, you want to make sure that your pet stays clean and healthy. Keep in mind that at some local pet stores, guinea pig grooming is a service that is offered. You can also find an array of supplies there for your guinea pig grooming needs. Always remember that if you have any questions in regards to your guinea pig’s health and or grooming, call or see your local veterinarian.

By: Lee Martin

Author: Lee Martin
Resource Site : http://www.Guinea-Pig-Lovers.com
Come to the site and look around. Lots of good information.
Also a Free Mini-Course, for anyone wanting more
knowledge about guinea pigs.

Guinea Pig Health

Guinea Pig Health.

Whether you are thinking of adopting or you are already a proud owner of a guinea pig, how to properly care for this delightful creature is essential for good guinea pig health.

A good Veterinarian that specializes in exotic animals is an important factor in your guinea pigs health as it grows. Your vet will provide regular checkups and advise you in the best nutrition and exercise for your guinea pigs health. It is very important not to neglect taking your guinea pig to the vet regularly or not taking them at all. Choosing a vet in advance is also crucial in the case of an emergency. Waiting until the last minute to choose a vet during an emergency could possibly cause major repercussions in your guinea pigs health or life.

Proper nutrition is essential to guinea pig health and well-being. For guinea pigs there are many do’s and don’ts’ and not following the correct diet could cause weight gain, weight loss malnutrition, vitamin deficiencies, and overgrown teeth. Guinea pigs love a variety of foods such as pellets, grass, vegetables, and fruits. When buying pellets for your guinea pig make sure they don’t have added dyes, nuts, corn, dried fruits or meat and dairy byproducts. Rabbit pellets are toxic for guinea pigs and should never be fed to your pet as a substitute. Purchase pellets that are fortified with vitamin C as guinea pigs cannot produce their own and depletion could cause problems to your guinea pigs health such as Scurvy.

Grass may not seem so important but for the proper development of guinea pig health it plays a big role. Guinea pigs chew on grass to prevent their teeth from overgrowing, and also to help aid their digestive system. Orchard grass and Silk grass are considered a real treat for your guinea pig.

Guinea pigs get a vital portion of their vitamins from consuming fresh fruits and vegetables every day. Great choices for vegetables and fruits are spinach, romaine, tomatoes, cantaloupe, bell peppers, and thinly sliced carrots. Avoid cabbages, broccoli, and leafy greens, which produce too much gas, as it is bad for guinea pigs. Always give your guinea pig plenty of fresh water, but never give your pet mineral water.

Grooming your guinea pig only consists of brushing their teeth daily with a soft bristled toothbrush and brushing their fur to rid of the shedding hair. Only clip their nails once a month. They really don’t require to be bathed often, but when they do use a shampoo that your vet has recommended for small animals. Also, there is a grease gland above their rump, which can be quite tricky to clean. Ask your vet if they can give a special solution to clean this area, or simply use a light degreasing dish detergent.

If you take the very best care of your wonderful pet and follow this guide about the basics of your guinea pigs health then you will be able to reap the rewards of having such a charming animal as a companion.
Resource information : http://www.Guinea-Pig-Lovers.com

By:  Lee Martin

Lee is a animal and guinea pig lover.

resource info: http://www.Guinea-Pig-Lovers.com